Other publications include working papers published by other institutions, published consulting studies, etc. In this section, we provide summaries of these papers along with download options where available.

August 2017

 

Especially since the last economic crisis of 2008 discussions about innovative financing for development have gathered pace. In the 2011 Agenda for Change, the European Commission recognises that government and donor funds are largely insufficient to cover the substantial investments required to improve living conditions in developing and transition countries. This paper analyses key initiatives influencing the current reasoning behind financing of EU external aid measures, and presents options to pursue innovative financing for development by the EU.

June 2013

With wages rising across Asia, the factors that made Asia the “Workshop of the World” for the past several decades are changing. Ethiopia’s strategic location, natural resources, and abundant labor position it to become the next global location for labor-intensive manufacturing.

This survey assesses the extent to which the numbers, the business stories, and the analysis validate the pitch and the proposition, and identifies the sectors in which the business opportunities in emerging
Ethiopia are likely to be found.

Workshop proceedings, SIPA/COMESA RIA/BizClim/BKP, September 2012

The Government of Swaziland, through the Ministry of Finance and the Swaziland Investment Promotion Authority (SIPA) and with the support of the ACP Business Climate Facility (BizClim) organised a one-week event on Public-Private Partnerships (PPP), consisting of a one-day conference and a four-day intensive training programme, from July 16 to 20, 2012.

These proceedings summarise the presentations and discussions.

Strategy report, EACCIA/BizClim/BKP, August 2012

Public infrastructure development has been recognised by many as crucial to economic growth and prosperity on the African continent in general and in the East African Community in particular. The OECD underlines the substantial benefits Africa could achieve through the development of its infrastructure, measuring the potential impact as lying around 2% GDP. The positive impact in the East African region would be even greater than in most other parts of the continent.